Why do some of the world's most valued wines use poisons?

Why do some of the world's most valued wines use poisons?

So why is it, when 'natural' wines are all the rage, do many Bordeaux grape-growers persist with spraying everything they can on their vines?

Because it's what they've always done? After all, Bordeaux Mixture (equal parts copper sulphate and calcium oxide in water - used against mildew) was named after the region.

Fortunately, as reported recently in The Drinks Business, it looks as if good old people power might be the catalyst to change things.

Headlines describing kids getting ill from careless spraying, and a ponderously slow (it's often the way in France) acceptance of change, add fuel to the protesters' case.

As ever, generalisations are unfair to the many Bordeaux vignerons who have already shunned such agro-chemical treatments wherever possible. This is a huge region with over 4,000 separate Châteaux, and each year more and more sign up to organic, biodynamic and sustainable farming methods.

Chianti: when the headline's in need of revision

Chianti: when the headline's in need of revision

How much should you spend on wine?

How much should you spend on wine?